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bosoxvox

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Reply with quote  #1 
Dan,
I came across a passage in George MacDonald's writings today which I thought encapsulates Jars' song "Oh My God." I was wondering if you would give your thoughts on it:

"'Oh God!' I cried, and that was all. But what are the prayers of the whole universe more than an expansion of that one cry? It is not what God can give us, but God that we want."

Thanks,
Ben
SealOfServants

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Reply with quote  #2 
I was JUST reading this very passage in C.S. Lewis's George MacDonald: An Anthology and meditating on it 2 nights ago! Freaky!

~Derek
jfaith210

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Reply with quote  #3 
George MacDonald is the man! He's my favorite author of all time!

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“Man finds it hard to get what he wants, because he does not want the best; God finds it hard to give, because He would give the best, and man will not take it.” ~ George MacDonald




bosoxvox

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Reply with quote  #4 
Actually, I read that passage in Lewis' anthology. I generally try to read anything that Lewis recommends. This, however, is the first MacDonald I've read. I've read just about all of Lewis' theology and fiction, and one can certainly see MacDonald's imprint upon Lewis in those works. Thus far I've been stunned by MacDonald's poignancy and, as Lewis put it, continual closeness to the Spirit of Christ. Next on my list is Phantastes.
SealOfServants

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Reply with quote  #5 
Phantastes is great. His most popular book was a fairy tale called, The Princess and the Goblin, which was excellent. Try Lilith and Unspoken Sermons as well, both of which were major influences on Lewis.

Have you read The Everlasting Man by G.K. Chesterton? This was Lewis's second fav. book right behind Phantastes, and since I read it, I would rank it as my second favorite book of all time.

~Derek

bosoxvox

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thanks for the recommendations. I'll give them a try. My "to read list" is quite expansive at the moment! I have read The Everlasting Man, though it is the only Chesterton I've read. In his case, lucidity and the ability to do compelling apologetics without being polemical were clearly influential upon Lewis. To my mind it ranks right next to Mere Christianity as a hallmark of modern apologetics. I should probably reread it, as it's been awhile!
SealOfServants

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Reply with quote  #7 
Bosoxvox,

As a Lewis fan, you may have already seen this. But Lewis gave a list of the top ten books that influenced his philosophy of life and thinking:

1. Phantastes by George MacDonald.
2.The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton.
3. The Aeneid by Virgil.
4. The Temple by George Herbert.
5. The Prelude by William Wordsworth.
6. The Idea of the Holy by Rudolf Otto. 
7. The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius. 
8. Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell. 
9. Descent into Hell by Charles Williams. 
10. Theism and Humanism by Arthur James Balfour.

I've only read a few of these. But I thought you'd find it interesting if you didn't happen to know about it.

~Derek
bosoxvox

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Reply with quote  #8 
Derek,
Amazingly enough I hadn't run across this list before. Thanks for forwarding it to me! The Everlasting Man I think is the only one I've read in its entirety. I read most of The Aeneid in high school, but that high school reading is getting a bit fuzzier each year. Also a candidate for rereading. These will definitely go to the top of that list! Thanks!
-Ben
SealOfServants

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Reply with quote  #9 
You're welcome! The only one on there I've read that I haven't already mentioned is Descent Into Hell, which was good in its way, but is so idiosyncratic that it's hard to penetrate. I think Lewis only liked it so much because he was good friends with Williams by the time he read it and was able to understand his theology and narrative style. A weird and sometimes wearisome read, but definitely worth getting around to.

~Derek
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